Village Voice — September 26, 2012
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THUR. 9/27

BOOKS

WIRE TAP

BALTIMORE WITH A BRITISH TWIST

There have been a lot of comparisons between the latest wave of “smart” TV dramas and the Victorian novel: both serialized, both once considered low culture. But none so literal—or so literary—as Down in the Hole: The unWired World of H.B. Ogden. The new book by Joy DeLyria and Sean Michael Robinson re-imagines HBO’s The Wire as a long-forgotten 19thcentury masterpiece, only now just assuming its rightful place in the English canon. Based on their meme-status blog and structured as an academic essay, it includes excerpts, illustrations, and many an instance for Mr. McNulty to proclaim “Aw, fuck” (explained in the book’s footnotes as, “mid-19th century slang, an expression of dismay”). But unlike some Seth Grahame-Smith–ish copy-and-paste jobs, DeLyria and Robinson seem to be out for more than just yuks, making a valid case about the legacy-potential of pop culture. Tonight, they’ll host a reading along with comic book critic Tucker Stone. At 7, Housing Works Bookstore Café, 126 Crosby Street, 212-334-3324, housingworks.org, free HEATHER BAYSA

BURLESQUE

ALL TOPS OFF

CATCH FOUR NIGHTS OF TASSEL TWIRLING

It takes a certain kind of person to get up on stage and strip. It takes a whole different kind of person to get up on stage and sing, tap dance, hula hoop, breathe fire, do a magic trick, tell a joke or two, and strip.These performers are of that second breed. The 10th Annual New York Burlesque Festival is back to celebrate a decade of all things suggestive. From busty broads to boylesque to trans play, there will be something to titillate every type as more than 100 burlesque artists from all over the world gather for the four-night-long tease. The Saturday Spectacular is not to be missed, nor Sunday’s Golden Pastie Awards with an appearance by the legendary Tempest Storm. Audience members can vote for finalists online in categories such as Best Beefcake, Cutest Geek, and Most Likely to Survive the Zombie Apocalypse.Be ready for a fierce competition— performers can be very, very persuasive.Starts tonight, through Sunday, various locations, thenewyorkburlesquefestival.Com, $10–$65 HEATHER BAYSA

FRI. 9/28

BOOKS

GRAPHIC CONTENT

ART BOOKS FOR EVERYONE

The absolute best time of year to collect beautiful books and magazines for your coffee table is always in the fall when the New York Art Book Fair rolls into MOMA P.S.1. Check out artists’ books, catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines from nearly 300 international indie publishers, booksellers, presses, and antiquarians from around the world. Not just about looking at books, the fair also offers outstanding screenings, discussions, and performances. Highlights include today’s talk with acclaimed graphic designer Karel Martens and a presentation of Sk Sk, a “reperformance” of a skipping CD with acoustic and electronic instruments, by Kid Millions and others. Starts today, through September 30, MOMA P.S.1, 22- 25 Jackson Avenue, Queens, nyartbookfair.com, free ANGELA ASHMAN

MUSIC

FACTORY GIRL

PATTI SMITH PAYS TRIBUTE TO ANDY WARHOL

Without fail, Patti Smith’s annual performances at the Met’s Gracey Rainey Rogers auditorium are among the most reliably excellent events of the fall. Last year, to coincide with the museum’s Alfred Stieglitz exhibit, Smith paired a set of songs with readings from the love letters the photographer and gallerist exchanged with his wife, Georgia O’Keeffe, while tonight she celebrates the life of her contemporary Andy Warhol in a musical companion to the ongoing “Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years.” She’ll be joined by her daughter, Jesse Paris Smith. Tickets are sold out, but it’s worth hunting down extras, because unlike those Campbell’s soup cans, nights this special can’t be mass produced. At 7, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, 212-570-3949, sold out NICK MURRAY

FILM

SWEET & VICIOUS

UP LATE? CATCH THIS CLASSIC.

Due to the national obsession with troubled former child stars (we’ve all seen at least one episode of any VH1 reality series) and current child stars who are sure to be troubled in the not-so-distant future (Toddlers & Tiaras, anyone?), who wouldn’t want to see the scariest tale of a child star gone berserk? Tonight, Sunshine Landmark Cinema on the Lower East Side is continuing its Sunshine @ Midnight series with late-night showings of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? This 1962 psychothriller, starring dueling legends Bette Davis and Joan Crawford, follows to a shocking end the chilling rivalry between two fame-hungry sisters who share a mutual and vicious jealousy of each other. As the original poster read, “Sister, sister, oh, so fair, why is there blood all over your hair?” At midnight, also Saturday, Sunshine Landmark Cinema, 143 East Houston Street, 212-330-8182, $10 BRITTANY SPANOS

FESTIVAL

ART ATTACK

DUMBO GETS COVERED IN COLOR

Ever wish you could leap tall buildings in a single bound? Tonight you can at the installation “Superhero,” part of the 16th annual Dumbo Arts Festival. The art and technology studio Wildbytes presents this “interactive projection mapping experience” that will show your image flying over buildings, throwing light balls, or growing into a giant. The piece is part of the more than 500 exhibits on display for the next three days. Check out reflective, floating sculptures on the East River, works of “moss graffiti,” interactive origami, and other works to set your imagination on overdrive. Starts today, through September 30, DUMBO, between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges, for complete information, go to dumboartsfestival.com, free ANGELA ASHMAN

SAT. 9/29

BOOKS

LISTEN UP!

THE ART OF THE BLACK POWER MOVEMENT LIVES ON

When the hip-hop-presaging Last Poets released their second album, This is Madness, in 1971, it was accompanied by an ad campaign proclaiming: “If you’re white, this record will scare the shit out of you. If you’re black, this record will scare the nigger out of you.” Both the album’s cover— flaming background with dashikis up front—and the full-page ad are reproduced, along with fistfuls of other colorful graphics, in Listen Whitey! The Sights and Sounds of Black Power 1965–1975 (Fantagraphics). Tonight the author, Pat Thomas, visits Brooklyn to spin tunes and project album covers and posters reproduced in such chapters as “Honkies for Huey” and “Negroes With Guns and Radios.” At 6, Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, 80 Hansen Place, Brooklyn, 718-230-0492, mocada.org, free R.C. BAKER

FESTIVAL

ISN’T SHE LOVELY?

GET DOLLED UP FOR BUSHWIG

Although some might still be holding their breaths for Wigstock, that bawdy drag extraganza of the ’80s, ’90s, and early ’00s, to return to the East Village, a couple of newcomers have stepped up to create their own tradition. Known as Babes Trust (the British musician behind the successful Tranny Olympics in London) and Horrorchata, they’re putting together the first annual Bushwig, a day-long festival for the burgeoning experimental performance-art and drag scene in Bushwick. The celebration includes barbecue, makeovers, a photobooth, games, prizes, and sets from 30 fabulously named queens, including Jiggly Caliente, Cindy Gaudentight, and Sophie Skintight. From 2 to 11, Secret Project Robot, 389 Melrose Street, Brooklyn, secretprojectrobot.org, $5 for anyone dressed in drag, $10 for the less adventurous. ANGELA ASHMAN

FESTIVAL

CALLING ALL NERDS

IT’S TIME FOR SOME WEIRD SCIENCE

If you get off on shooting geysers of soda heavenward, then head to Queens for the Coke Zero and Mentos Show at this year’s World Maker Faire. With more than 500 “makers” exhibiting everything from DIY 3-D printers and musical propane tanks to a 25-ton life-size “mousetrap” set atop a 6,500-square-foot game board, this festival should delight nerds of every stripe. At the “Arduino Hour” you can catch up on a “popular open-source electronics prototyping platform”—if you know what that means, you need a ticket. Today from 10 to 7, Sunday from 10 to 6, New York Hall of Science (NYSCI), 47-01 111th Street, Queens, makerfaire.com, $12-$30 (includes admission to both World Maker Faire and NYSCI) R.C. BAKER

SUN. 9/30

COMEDY

FRESH AIR

TUNE INTO THIS LIVE RADIO SHOW

You can try all day, but you won’t find the old-time radio program Thrilling Adventure Hour on any station. That’s because the show, created and written by Ben Acker and Ben Blacker, exists only on stage, with celebrity guests, once a month at the Coronet Theatre in Los Angeles. But tonight, the fun comes east with all of its fictional sponsors, musical numbers, and comedy sketches that tell stories of war heroes (“Jefferson Reid, Ace American”), superheroes (“The Adventures of Captain Laserbeam”), and real-life heroes (“Amelia Earhart, Fearless Flyer”). For this onenight stop in Brooklyn, the lineup includes Paul F. Tompkins (Mr. Show), Paget Brewster (Criminal Minds), John Hodgman (Bored to Death), Busy Philipps (Freaks and Geeks), and James Urbaniak (American Splendor). At 7:30 and 10, the Bell House, 149 7th Street, Brooklyn, 718-643- 6510, thrillingadventurehour.com, $30 ANGELA ASHMAN

ART

SECRET IDENTITIES

ASIANS IN AMERICAN COMICS, THEN AND NOW

Opening today at the Museum of Chinese in America, “Marvels and Monsters” chronicles 40 years of Asian figures in American comics, from racist caricatures of World War II propaganda through the 1980s, accompanied by commentary from Asian-American comics creators such as Larry Hama, Gene Luen Yang, and Ken Chen. (One wince-inducing exhibit, “Shades of Yellow,” compares skin tones in comics to their garish Pantone equivalents.) Sister exhibition “Alt.Comics” features work by Asian-American creators in a modern, indie-comics context; Yang’s American Born Chinese, for example, presents a rich portrait that still grapples with a legacy of outsiderness. Through February 24, Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre Street, 212-619-4785, mocanyc.org, $7 ROB STAEGER

MON. 10/1

THEATER

PULLING STRINGS

PAPERMOON PUPPET THEATRE EXPLORES INDONESIA’S UGLY PAST

Created by the daughter of a former Indonesian air force officer and the grandson of a wayang puppet master, Papermoon Puppet Theatre’s Mwathirika (Swahili for “victim”) restores the historically repressed Indonesian killings of 1965–66, when half a million citizens were slaughtered by the military and local vigilantes during an anti-communist crackdown, back to Indonesia’s collective consciousness.Based in Yogyakarta, Papermoon uses Japanese-style bunraku and smaller kuruma ningyo puppets (manipulated by puppeteers sitting on small wooden seats with wheels) to tell a nonverbal story about “the year of living dangerously” from the point of view of neighborhood children. Part Bread and Puppet Theater, part Brothers Quay, Mwathirika transforms an era that has virtually disappeared from Indonesian history books into a dark fairy tale accessible to a new generation. At 8, Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, 212-288-6400, asiasociety.org, $17–$20 RICHARD GEHR

TUES. 10/2

BOOKS

AMERICA’S SWEETHEART

STEPHEN COLBERT STILL LOVES THE U.S.A.

Maxim’s 69th sexiest woman of 2012, Stephen Colbert, has made a career (and a Super PAC) out of not un-sarcastically mocking his favorite country in the universe on his Comedy Central show, The Colbert Report. In his new book, America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t, the comedian gives advice on how to solve America’s problems, from a poor economy to poor diets (“Feel free to deep fry this book—it’s a rich source of fiber”). Catch him promoting the book— and all around truthiness—at Barnes & Noble Union Square. At 8:30, Barnes and Noble, 33 East 17th Street, 212-253-0810, free SARAH WILLETS

WED. 10/3

THEATER

FIGHT BACK

THE CIVILIANS PRESENT A REVOLUTIONARY CABARET

What good is it sitting alone in your room when you could instead trek out to the Fishman space in the Fisher Building, the gorgeous new addition to the Brooklyn Academy of Music. There might be a certain irony in staging a cabaret about the world’s first socialist revolution in such luxurious surroundings, but expect the Civilians, a vigorous troupe specializing in off-kilter documentary drama, to explore and enjoy it. As part of the Next Wave Festival, Steven Cosson and Michael Friedman offer Paris Commune, a piece first presented at the Public Lab in 2008 in which an 11-member corps celebrates the 1871 Paris Commune, a brief attempt to install a working-class government. Amid monologues culled from contemporary records, the actors perform vigorous songs and dances honoring the popular culture of the period. Yes, they cancan. Opens tonight, through October 7, Fishman Space, BAM Fisher, 821 Ashland Place, Brooklyn, 718- 636-4100, bam.org, $20 (post-show talks on October 5 and 6) ALEXIS SOLOSKI

MUSIC

Super Bass

Celebrate six years of Trouble & Bass

After six years of blowing minds and speakers, Trouble & Bass (that’s AC Slater, the Captain, Star Eyes, and ringleader Drop the Lime) come to SRB Brooklyn for the best birthday party a kid could hope for. Tonight, the guests of honor include Nadastrom, a pair of club and electro Djs turned moombahton original dons; Salva, he whose “Mercy” remix quickly became one of the most unavoidable dance tracks of the summer; and MikeQ, the ballroom producer who can flip even a set of AOL stock samples into a hot new vogue track. There won’t be cake, but free Vodka Red Bulls before midnight should keep the party going well into the morning. Friday at 10, SRB, 177 Second Avenue, Brooklyn, 718-499-1700, srbbrooklyn.com, $15-$25 NICK MURRAY
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